Mai Yamani

Rose Wilder Lane ebooks

I haven't actually read any of these yet, but I thought I'd link them for coercedbynutmeg and anyone else who might be interested in Rose Wilder Lane's writing outside the Little House books.

I am so close to getting my hands on a copy of Pioneer Girl: The Annotated Autobiography! Only sixteen people ahead of me!

These books are all available to download or read online at any time:

The Making of Herbert Hoover (1919) is the solution to the mystery of why Rose Wilder Lane's papers are held in the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library.

Charlie Chaplin's Own Story: Being a Faithful Recital of a Romantic Career, Beginning with Early Recollections of Boyhood in London and Closing with the Signing of His Latest Motion-Picture Contract (1916) is another, earlier biography, with an amazingly entertaining subtitle.

Henry Ford's Own Story: How a Farmer Boy Rose to the Power that Goes with Many Millions, Yet Never Lost Touch With Humanity (1917), likewise.

Diverging Roads (1919) is the only novel in the selection of public domain titles. It seems to be about a girl trying to make her fortune in telegraph operation.

These books are not exactly free, but you can check out ebooks from Open Library, or at least add your name to the waiting list, which is still pretty great:

Young Pioneers (originally titled Let the Hurricane Roar, 1932) is a novelized version of some of the same material that would later become On the Banks of Plum Creek. Under the original title the names of the characters were actually Charles and Caroline, but they were later changed to David and Molly; I'm not sure if any other changes were made at that time.

Free Land (1938) followed on the success of Let the Hurricane Roar but seems to be a less optimistic take on the same material.

Old Home Town (1935) is a collection of short stories originally published in the Saturday Evening Post which seem, from the introduction, to be aiming towards a sort of portrait of small-town life. Actual story titles: Old Maid, Hired Girl, Immoral Woman, Long Skirts, Traveling Man, Thankless Child, Nice Old Lady. I am not making these up.

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I don't see any proof, but it's funny how quick many are to say OMG NO NO NO SHE WAS MARRIED without actually knowing either way. In my mind, she's in the same category as Nancy Drew.