however improbable

Until next time

I haven't been so relieved by a plot twist in a long time!

By which of course I mean that there were no few lines of code that are the magical key to open everything ever. Because that was just preposterous even by television computer science standards and there was no guarantee that that was going to get undone, unlike, you know, that other plot twist.

This and Belgravia were both adapted from iconic short stories where there nevertheless isn't really that much there there, certainly not an hour and a half's worth of it. With 'A Scandal in Bohemia' they came up with a lot of things to happen after the original story really properly ends–instead of letting Irene cash in her chips, she keeps raising the stakes, making it a narrative inevitability that Sherlock will double up and win, and yeah, I do find it kind of annoying that everyone always feels like they have to do Irene Adler since they always do her wrong. Whereas with this episode I at least felt like the elaboration of the plot was a little more organic, with the same basic plot summary intact at the center (like a spider in the centre of its web!): Holmes knows about Moriarty's criminal masterminding but he can't do anything about it within the law.

Also, I'm not going to lie, I seal-clapped with glee when John and Sherlock got handcuffed together. Haven't we all a.) read that fic, b.) written that fic, c.) wanted to write that fic but decided it was too cracktastic, or d.) two or more of the above?

Also also: Sherlock is hanging around his own funeral and he's not only not in disguise, he's still wearing the same scarf? Okay, John is too distraught to notice, but what's everyone else's excuse? I would so have cut that shot with extreme prejudice if I were editing this.

I accidentally logged out of LJ for the first time in years and what I saw was so horrifying that I've got to work out a coherent Dreamwidth posting/accessing/circling setup posthaste.
  • Current Mood: chipper chipper
By which of course I mean that there were no few lines of code that are the magical key to open everything ever. Because that was just preposterous even by television computer science standards and there was no guarantee that that was going to get undone, unlike, you know, that other plot twist.

Oh, goodness, yes. Egregiously ridiculous, that, but then... why did Sherlock believe it? He didn't know he was in a television show where computers sometimes do magic things, so he has no excuse (and that's why Moriarty was making fun of him).
And deservedly so! I think the poor boy was so dazzled by having a proper nemesis that the distinction between improbable and impossible went right out the window. *g*
I am uncertain how much of everything after he tells Molly he trusts her and needs something from her, was an act on his part. Actually no, I'm uncertain from the point that they start hiding out in St. Bart's. Clearly he planned faking his death, somehow. He may have been mostly talking to keep Moriarty busy until he John was there and could witness the jump.